THE RED WINDOWS by Patrick Mac’Avoy, Trans. by Jacques Houis

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The Red Windows

Les Fenêtres RougesPublished by Editions Saint-Germain-des Prés (Collection Blanche), 1983

FIGURES OF SPACE: SUBJECT, BODY, PLACE by Paola Mieli, Trans. by Jacques Houis

Figures of Space: Subject, Body, Place

Figures of Space-Subject, Body, PlaceThe paintings of hands, Cueva de las Manos (Cave of Hands), Santa Cruz, Argentina, 9300 BP (about 7300 BC).
FIGURES OF SPACE explores the implications of Freud’s assertion that the “psyche is extended,” and gives a novel approach to the understanding of the subject’s relation to the world. In Mieli’s words, the subjective landscape is, given its origins, intrinsically libidinized. Topics range from humor, defined as the “making of space where there is none”, to angst, phobia and the uncanny, from sexual difference to hatred. Diverse examples are drawn from art, literature and cinema, including the works of Poe, Melville, Pontormo, Marina Abramovich, Otto Wagner, Charlie Chaplin and Philippe Petit.
Author Bio:
Paola Mieli is a psychoanalyst practicing in New York. A founding member and president of Après-Coup Psychoanalitic Association, she has written on psychoanalysis, psychoanalysis and culture, literature, art, and politics. Her essays have been published in the US, South America, and Europe.
Translated from the French by Jacques Houis.
Reviews:

Figures of Space-Subject, Body, Place 1

THE RAMBLE by Patrick Mac’Avoy, Trans. by Jacques Houis

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The Ramble

La BalladePublished by Éditions Julliard (René Julliard), Paris, 1966

 

THE COMIC ROMANCE by Paul Scarron, Trans. by Jacques Houis

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The Comic RomanceThe Comic RomancePaul Scarron’s masterpiece, The Comic Romance, recounts the adventures of a troupe of provincial itinerant actors, skilfully weaving comic anecdotes of their amorous exploits and the central love story between Léandre and his beloved Angélique into a rich and realistic tapestry depicting rural France.

A milestone of picaresque literature, The Comic Romance spawned countless imitations in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries, and was championed in the nineteenth century by eminent literary figures such as Théophile Gautier and Gérard de Nerval.
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‘Paul Scarron is the Homer of the school of buffoonery.’ Théophile Gautier
‘Jacques Houis’s lively new translation conveys the energy and vitality of Scarron’s original… a welcome revival of a comic classic.’ Times Literary Supplement